Energy

Die Staumauer Grande-Dixence
The Grande-Dixence dam in Valais. © Grande Dixence SA – essencedesign.com

The FDFA works closely with the Federal Office of Energy, the State Secretariat for Economic Affairs and other federal authorities to coordinate and contribute to Switzerland's energy policy at the global level.

Switzerland's energy policy

A secure energy supply, the fight against climate change and the sustainability and competitiveness of the Swiss economy are the key challenges for Switzerland’s energy sector.  The Federal Council has adopted the Energy Strategy 2050 in response to these challenges. At the same time, the strategy is also helping to reduce Switzerland's energy footprint.

Foreign affairs play a crucial role in the energy sector because the challenges are complex and cannot be overcome without close international cooperation.

Bilateral and multilateral relations

Switzerland’s relations with its neighbours and partner countries in the energy sector are based on a strong interdependence, with closely interconnected energy networks and energy supply sectors. Security of supply, cross-border energy infrastructure, the promotion of renewable energies and energy efficiency are main areas in which Switzerland cooperates internationally. An active energy policy at bilateral, European and multilateral levels is essential to ensure optimal relations with Switzerland’s international partners. The aim of this policy is to safeguard Switzerland’s interests, since some 75% of its energy supply depends on fossil and nuclear fuel imports.

As a member state in multilateral bodies such as the International Energy Agency (IEA), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Energy Charter and the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), Switzerland also has an active say in energy issues.

Furthermore, Switzerland is contributing to efforts to reduce dependence on fossil fuels, for instance by participating in the Friends of Fossil Fuel Subsidy Reform group.